Skip to main content

Making Sense of Teen Arguments

Any parent of a teen knows that the adolescent years can be bumpy, to say the least. They are filled with mood swings, hormone changes and oftentimes a lot of arguing. But don't be discouraged; it's not all bad. The good thing about arguing is that it provides teachable moments. And that's what the teen years are all about. Parents have multiple opportunities to teach, shape and mold their teen. New research suggests that having wholesome arguments with your teen may actually help them say "NO" to peer pressure. As parents, we all know that that can be a good thing.

Helping Kids Deal With ANGER.

Children today seem to have the weight of the world on their shoulders, or at least they seem to think they do. It’s not uncommon to walk down the street and see them dressed in black clothing from head to toe, hear them voicing their frustrations loudly to whomever will listen, or simply see them scowl at the world. Unfortunately, this behavior is not isolated to teens, who parents have accepted as the “angry, angst-filled” segment of the population; it can be witnessed in younger children aged, three to thirteen, as well. With busy social calendars, more toys, clothes, and gadgets to their names than any other generation in the history of the world, and more income at their disposal than previous generations – it brings to mind the question of exactly what do these children have to be angry about?

Finding the Fun with Your Kids in Social Networks

They’re called “digital natives” - the teens, tweens (and younger) who were born into a world rich with technology. Their formative years have included surfing the web, playing video games with friends halfway around the world, navigating smart phones and tablets and being able to connect instantly to any information with a few keystrokes.

Why Kids Lie – Age by Age

"Daddy puts on your bras sometimes," my then 4-year-old said nonchalantly as I tried on lingerie in a department store dressing room.

Online Safety Tips for Parents and Kids

Parents’ concerns about Internet safety used to be confined to the computer. Today, kids have more access to the Internet through smart phones and gaming devices so the potential for cyberbullying is greater than ever.

Parents Are the Key

Experts agree that parents can help reduce the risk of a crash involving their teen driver. Take the following simple, lifesaving steps:

Lessons For Life

<strong>Teaching our children positive problem solving skills</strong>

Growing Up Digital

<strong><em>Helping Your Teen Navigate Social Networks &amp; Mobile Phones</em></strong>

Signs Your Teen Might Be in Trouble

Teenagers can behave in strange ways that often mystify adults. For some parents their teen's moods or actions keep them up at night.

Fending Off the Bad Friends

I pressed a button on the answering machine, and an imperious voice demanded:  “Sally, this is Amanda. Call me right away. It’s important.” Hoping to delete the child, I pressed another button. But the machine lacked the power for the job.