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Helping Kids Face Their Fears

Everyone gets scared... but it takes certain skills to learn how to face fear head on.

Help Children Face Their Fears

<p align="left">Imagining themselves as stronger or bigger than they really are will help some children — and that's fine. This is not the time for a reality check, says Donna B. Marold, Ph.D., a psychologist and research associate at the University of Denver. For instance, when Eileen Mullen's 5-year-old son, Patrick, of Ridgewood, New Jersey, recently told her, "If a bad guy comes into the house, I'm going to go after him and kick him out," she didn't bother correcting him. Distraction can also work. For example, if you know a thunderstorm is on the horizon, pop in your child's favorite videotape or open a board game — and divert his attention with a treat, such as ice cream.</p>